EcoTourismHub
Page: Independent Power Producer

Ecotourism Hub
   Eco Means of Travel
   KLIA-Leading in Eco-Standards
   KLIA-Next Generation Hub
   KKIA domestic hub
   Benchmark for National Parks
   What Ecotourism should be
Ecotourism Destinations | Malaysia
   Borneo Island | Ecotourism
   Sabah
   Imbak Canyon Conservation
   Colonial-styled Passenger Train
   Rhino Saved in dramatic rescue
   Climb Mt Kinabalu
   Challenges of scaling Mt Kinabalu
   Been there, done that
   Mt Kinabalu Climbathon
   Sepilok Orang Utan Sanctuary
   Sandakan's Many Charm
   Coral Reef in Semporna
   Sipadan Island
   Dive Permit at Sipadan
   Scuba Diving
   Best Diving Spots
   Protecting Sipadan
   Mabul Island
   Semporna kidnap
   Pom Pom Island
   Rare Whale
   The Finest Forests
   Shark Fin Ban
   Casino stops serving Shark fin
   Airline joins Shark fin ban
   Kinabalu Park World Heritage
   Sarawak
   A Memorable Visit to Bako
   Semenggoh Wildlife Centre
   Birding Havens in Sarawak
   Segon Cave and Bung Brunggu
   Borneo Convention Centre
   Biodiversity | Sarawak
   155,000ha allowed
   Singer Dayang to Help Orang Utans
   Ancient Croc Effigies
   Potential Ecotourism Icon
   Peninsular Malaysia | Ecotourism
   Taman Negara
   Living off the forest’s bounty
   350kg Tapir
   Endau Rompin National Park
   Endau-Rompin Location Map
   Kenyir Lake
   Kenyir Lake Triathlon
   Kenyir Lake DFZ
   Rebirth of Kenyir Lake
   Frasers Hill
   Royal Belum
   Leaders In Destinations
   Rakan Royal Belum
   Save Temenggor
   Lessons in the Forest
   Cameron Highlands
   Looking for the Silk King
   New Route
   Sepetang Serenade
   Turtle Sanctuary Site in Kemaman
   Heritage Sites Malaysia
   Lenggong Valley
   George Town and Malacca Heritage Sites
   Kinabalu Park Heritage Site
   Mulu Cave Geopark
   Danum Valley
   Maliau Basin
   Bid for Unesco listing
   Valley of Heritage
   Ramsar sites | Malaysia
   Ramsar sites in Sarawak
   Events and Festivals Malaysia
   Most Searched Travel Spots 2011
   Indigenous Malaysian Tribes
   Indigenous Peninsular Malaysia
   Danawan Island home to Sea Gypsies
Costa Rica
   Retire Here, Not There: Costa Rica
   Costa Rica's Unspoiled Coast
Ecotourism News
   Open Zoo
   Rainforest Rock Festival
   Great Wall in Gopeng
   WTC2010
   Belaga braces for tourism boom
   Tourism drops
   Palazzo Park
   Permaculture
   Rainforest World Music Festival
   WEC2010
   Focus on eco-tourism
   Kuala Gandah Elephant Centre
   Ecotourism Spotlight Award
   Tourism News
   Art Tourism Hub
   Shopping Hub
   Art Tourism
Forest Reserve
   2010 Year of Biodiversity
   The Belum Forest Reserve
   Pulau Banding Rainforest Research Centre
   Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve
   Plant Mangrove Saplings in Port Dickson
   FRIM’s first research station
   FRIM declared heritage site
   FRIM PHOTO CONTEST
   Forest Reserve News
   South Peat Swamp Forest
   Forest Reserve to grow Oil Palm
   Save the Rain Forest
   Demystifying Forensic Forestry
   Forest Reserve in Pangkor
   Forest Research Centre - Sabah
   Forest reserve gazetted in Puchong
   Rape of Lenggong forest reserve
   Development project in Forest Reserve
   FruitPlast
   SAFE Project
   SEARRP
   Saving Temenggor
   Selangor Peat Swamp
   Vanishing wetlands
   Before it is Too Late
   Tree Cover-up
   Forests to Tree Farms
   Forest by the Coast
Green
   IGEM
   The Green Initiatives
   Ecologic Label
   Rebuilding the Green Concept
   Sabah Intensifies Green Effort
   Going Google can mean Going Green
   City of Kyoto from Car-Centric to Walking City
   Turning Consumers Green
   Penang mulling over No-car Zone
   3Rs among Malaysians
   Independent Power Producer
   Roof-top Secret Garden
   Bamboo
   Population and Food
   Never Drink From Plastic
Water
   Water Footprint
   Think water conservation
   Bakun Dam
   Turning to Eco-tourism
   Bengoh Dam
   Water Concern
   Beach
   Tap Water
   Water Worries 1
   Mini-hydro Plant
   Mekong River
   Mekong News
   Water Challenge
   Looming Water Crisis
Sustainable Food Source
   Eating Insects
   U.N. Urges Eating Insects
   Insects may be the answer
   Eat Insects
   Meat is Not Green
   Health Benefits of Eating Less Meat
   Vegetarian Athletes
   Catherine Johnson, Vegan Cyclist
   Vegan Athlete of the Year 2013
   Totally Vegetarian
   Veganism and the Environment
   Mongolia Nomads
   Antibiotics in Feed
   Butter is back
Wildlife Malaysia
   Carcasses of Tigers, Leopards from Malaysia
   Malayan Tiger
   Tiger spotted on road
   Save the Tiger
   Rare Photo
   Tracing Malaysia's Tigers
   A New Hope For Malayan Tigers
   The Conservation Of Tigers
   Why Tigers Matter
   Tiger Ambassador
   White Tiger Cubs
   Siberian tiger
   Natural Habitat for Tigers
   King of the Jungle
   Permits for Zoo
   Rainbow Toad
   Orang Utan
   Leave orang utan alone
   Orang Utans
   Save Orang Utans
   Orang Utan Island
   Orang Utan Reserve in the Klang Valley
   Fireflies
   Fireflies Sanctuary gazetted
   Firefly Festival Taiping
   Crocodile Farm
   Marine Ecosystem
   Semporna marine life
   Shark
   Shark Sanctuaries
   Drop in Shark Catch
   No to Shark Fin Soup
   Stop Selling Shark Fin
   Dolphins in Port Klang
   Golden Arowana
   Symbol of Prosperity
   The Unsung Heroes
   Bees
   Save Bees From Extinction
   When Bee Stop Making Honey
   Honeybees need Help
   Help our Disappearing Bees
   Bringing back Honeybees
   Ladybird
   Dung Beetle
   Ants
   Earthworms
   Frog
   Hornbill
   Elephant
   Wild elephant
   Uneasy feeling
   Sea Anemone
   Dolphin
   Human-wildlife Conflict
   Perhilitan sets Trap for Panther
   Wildlife Act
   Illegal Wildlife Traders
   Rafflesia and Conservation Efforts
   new Rafflesia species found
   Cengal Besar
   Migratory Birds
Climate Change
   New directions for the UN
   Canada withdrawing from Kyoto
   Haze

December 13, 2011

Now you and I can also be an independent power producer

Households as clean, sustainable electricity producers?

In the mid-1990s, there were only “big” boys in electricity generation such as YTL Corp, Genting Sanyen and Malakoff. They were popularly known as Independent Power producers' or IPPs and were looked upon with envy as it was alleged that they were making big bucks because of relatively high rates they received from TNB.

Fast forward 15 years. Now you and I can also be an IPP (the term “clean and sustainable electricity producer” is preferred) albeit a very much smaller one but with a difference.

Any owner of a link, semi-detached or bungalow house can now be, subject to approval, a small clean and sustainable energy producer by generating green electricity (as opposed to fossil-fuelled electricity by the big IPPs) and distribution licensee (such as TNB) is obliged to purchase it. What all this means is that if you have a solar photovoltaic (PV) generator at home, you can apply to connect this generator to the grid, and get paid for selling the electricity generated to TNB over the next 21 years.

Solar energy is clean, environmentally friendly and has zero emissions. There is no depletion of natural resources and it is one of the fastest growing energy sources in the world.

And yes the rates are very attractive for generating electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) technology; it is about four times the normal domestic TNB electricity rates (at RM0.40 per kWh). All you have to do is simply to apply and obtain a feed-in approval from the newly-established Sustainable Energy Development Authority Malaysia (Seda Malaysia), sign a renewable energy power purchase agreement (REPPA) with TNB and install the solar PV system on your rooftop.

On the average, the bungalow is able to produce about 1,000 kWh of electricity per month (based on 10kW installed PV capacity). Given this, the owner may earn about RM1,200 per month (based on FiT rate RM1.20 per kWh if the PV system is commissioned by 2012) and recoup his investment within eight to nine years. The earnings may be even higher if the house owner meets other bonus criteria such as installing as a building-integrated PV system. The current cost of 1 kW solar PV system ranges from RM12,000 to RM14,000.

The interesting thing is that for your average household needs, you purchase the electricity from TNB at between RM0.33 to 42.6 per kWh but when you produce the clean electricity, you can sell it at between RM1.20 to RM1.70 per kWh depending on the installed capacity and the qualifying bonus criteria for solar PV.

The longer the sun shines, the more one can “export” electricity to the national grid during daylight hours (when power is urgently needed) and earn income. The downside and risk is that during cloudy days, the income can be reduced significantly when the sun is not shining. If you apply now, you can lock in these premium rates for the next 21 years!

Unlike the huge IPPs which use natural gas or coal as feedstock to generate electricity, the household does not need to pay for any raw material or fuel because sunshine is free. For as long as the sun is shining, the solar PV panels will generate electricity. Another advantage of solar power is that no extra space is required because the panels can be installed on the rooftop. (Suddenly rooftops have income potential. Many factory owners are now contemplating installing solar PV panels on their rooftop to earn extra revenue while others are approaching factory owners to rent them their roofs.)

On Dec 1 2011, Seda Malaysia invited the public including households, small and not-so-big IPPs (maximum size is 30 MW but only 5 MWp rated capacity for solar PV) to apply and book the amount of green electricity they intended to produce to sell it to the distribution licensee. There are fixed quotas for each of the four renewable energy sources namely biomass (including solid waste), biogas (including landfill), small hydro and solar PV. There was overwhelming response to solar PV especially for the non-individuals.

The good news is that bookings are still open for individuals and households intending to install solar PV systems as there is still available capacity for this category. As at Dec 7, Seda reported that the total unfulfilled quota for solar PV is 6,650 kW; 1,650 kW to be commissioned by the first half 2013, 2500 kW each for second half of 2013 and first half of 2014.

Translating these figures into households, it would mean that about 665 bungalow owners can avail themselves to the remaining capacity (assuming their average capacity is 10 kW). If all of the remaining capacity is taken up by semi-detached owners, the number will increase to 1,330 assuming their installed PV capacity is 5 kW. The figure for typical link houses, assuming an installed capacity of 3 kW, is 2,217 households.

The price guarantee for 21 years has been made possible by the Feed-in Tariff (FiT) scheme implemented by Seda Malaysia. This scheme will be financed by the newly-established Renewable Energy (RE) Fund, to which all electricity users (except for those domestic customers consuming less than 300 kWh per month) will be required to contribute an additional 1% of their electricity bill.

House-owners who do not participate in solar PV electricity generation should not begrudge the payment of the additional 1%. Instead they should view it as one of their contributions to a cleaner and healthier environment. This is their social contribution for cleaner air. The public and community must also share in undertaking this heavy responsibility with the Government.

Dr Pola Singh is a board member of the Sustainable Energy Development Authority (Seda), Malaysia. The views expressed are his own. The public can apply for the feed-in approval via efit.seda.gov.my and more information can be obtained from Seda's official portal at www.seda.gov.my

Source: The Star


Ecotourism Hub
Ecotourism Destinations | Malaysia
Ecotourism News
Green
Wildlife Malaysia
Glossary Ecotourism
Contact Ecotourismhub.com